logo

Middle East and North Africa Region

HPV Regional Profile

News

Announcing our Interactive Map in the MENA Region

We have crafted a new interactive map to support the efforts of the public health community to drive evidence-based public health policy and advocacy. The map will come handy if you want to explore the latest data on burden of HPV incidence and mortality in the MENA region.

Explore the interactive map
Statistics and Data Analytics
NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

11202

cases in 2018

DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

7601

deaths in 2018

Status of National HPV Vaccination Programme

Libya and the UAE are the only countries in the region that have the HPV vaccine in their national immunization programs.

Description
HPV

General Information

Human Papillomavirus

Burden of HPV infection

Across countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region (as defined by UNAIDS), between 0.2% and 13.9% of people are estimated to have HPV, which causes approximately 70% of invasive cervical cancers.1

Link between HPV infection and cancer

Human papillomavirus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted, is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract. Most sexually active women and men will be infected at some point in their lives and some may be repeatedly infected.

There are many types of HPV, and many do not cause problems. However, certain types of HPV can persist and progress to cancer. Cervical cancer is by far the most common HPV-related disease. Nearly all cases of cervical cancer can be attributable to HPV infection.4

Burden of cervical cancer

Cervical cancer causes at least 7,601 deaths among women annually in the MENA region (as defined by UNAIDS). Between 2012 and 2018, the number of deaths every year due to cervical cancer doubled in most countries in the region.1,2 If decisive action is not taken at the national and regional levels, annual deaths due to the preventable disease will double again by 2040, reaching 15,728 deaths per year.3 In the region, at least 11,202 women are newly diagnosed with cervical cancer each year.

Across the MENA region, incidence and mortality rates vary. For example, Somalia and Morocco have the highest incidence and mortality rates, with 24.0 and 17.2 women per 100,000 being newly diagnosed with cervical cancer annually and at least 21.9 and 12.6 women per 100,000 dying due to cervical cancer per year, respectively. Whereas Iran, Iraq and Yemen have the lowest (around 2 per 100,000 women are diagnosed per year and about 1 per 100,000 die because of cervical cancer annually).2


Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rate projections
Country Profiles

Algeria


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

1594


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

1066


Read more

Jordan


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

104


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

61


Read more

Kuwait


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

59


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

59


Read more

Lebanon


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

192


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

125


Read more

Libya


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

319


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

127


Read more

Morocco


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

3388


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

2465


Read more

Qatar


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

19


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

12


Read more

Saudi Arabia


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

316


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

158


Read more

The United Arab Emirates


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

108


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

56


Read more

Tunisia


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

285


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

199


Read more

Turkey


NEW CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

2356


DEATHS FROM CERVICAL CANCER IN 2018 (TOTAL)

1280


Read more
Research and Publications
  1. Gultekin, Murat, et al. “Mega Hpv Laboratories for Cervical Cancer Control: Challenges and Recommendations from a Case Study of Turkey.” Papillomavirus Research, vol. 7, June 2019, pp. 118–22, doi:10.1016/j.pvr.2019.03.002.
  2. Korkut, Yasemin. “Assessment of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors Regarding Breast and Cervical Cancer among Women in Western Turkey.” Journal of International Medical Research, Mar. 2019, p. 030006051983025, doi:10.1177/0300060519830252.
  3. Cift, Tayfur, et al. “Assessment of Knowledge and Attitudes of Midwives and Nurses Working at the Hospital about HPV Infection and Vaccinations.” European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, vol. 234, Mar. 2019, p. e176, doi:10.1016/j.ejogrb.2018.08.546.
  4. Aydoğmuş, Hüseyin, and Serpil Aydoğmuş. “Comparison of Colposcopic Biopsy Results of Patients Who Have Cytomorphological Normal but HPV 16-18 or Other High-Risk HPV Subtypes Positive.” Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention: APJCP, vol. 20, no. 2, Feb. 2019, pp. 417–20, doi:10.31557/APJCP.2019.20.2.417.
  5. Riahi, Shirin, et al. “The Incidence and Mortality Rate of Cervix Cancer in Iran from 1990 to 2016: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Running Title: Cervix Cancer in Iran.” Journal of Contemporary Medical Sciences, vol. 5, no. 1, Feb. 2019, http://www.jocms.org/index.php/jcms/article/view/514.
  6. Erdoğan, Bahattin, et al. “Analysis of Cervical Liquid-Based Cytology Results in Eskişehir, Turkey: Correlation of Cytology Results with Histology, Immunocytocemical HPV Ab and HPV DNA Results of 18404 Women.” International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health, vol. 6, no. 3, Feb. 2019, pp. 943–49, doi:10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20190576.
  7. Sait, Khalid, et al. “Genetic Diversity and Phylogenetic Analysis of HPV 16 & 18 Variants Isolated from Cervical Specimens of Women in Saudi Arabia.” Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences, vol. 26, no. 2, Feb. 2019, pp. 317–24, doi:10.1016/j.sjbs.2018.05.005.
  8. Jradi, Hoda, and Amen Bawazir. “Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices among Saudi Women Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Corresponding Vaccine.” Vaccine, vol. 37, no. 3, Jan. 2019, pp. 530–37, doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.11.065.
  9. Aldohaian, Arwa I., et al. “Using the Health Belief Model to Assess Beliefs and Behaviors Regarding Cervical Cancer Screening among Saudi Women: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study.” BMC Women’s Health, vol. 19, no. 1, Jan. 2019, p. 6, doi:10.1186/s12905-018-0701-2.
  10. Comba, Cihan, and Omer Demir. Why Are Cervical Smear Abnormalities Frequency Increasing in Turkey? 2019, p. 4.
  11. Seneldir, Hatice, and Gozde Kir. “Prevalence of High-Risk Human Papilloma Virus in Liquid-Based Cervical Samples from Turkish Women with Normal and Abnormal Cytology.” Diagnostic Cytopathology, vol. 47, no. 2, 2019, pp. 100–04, doi:10.1002/dc.24022.
  12. Ozaydin-Yavuz, Goknur, et al. “Determinants of Hgh-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infection in Anogenital Warts.” Advances in Dermatology and Allergology/Postępy Dermatologii i Alergologii, vol. 36, no. 1, 2019, pp. 76–81, doi:10.5114/ada.2019.82915.
  13. Akay, Ebru, et al. “Concordance of the Frequency, Typing, and Results of High Risk Human Papilloma Virus in Cervical Cytology Materials with Biopsy: Retrospective Analysis of 5604 Patients -.” Annals of Medical Research, vol. 26, no. 2, 2019, pp. 180–84, http://www.scopemed.org/?mno=1006363.
  14. Shabani, Maryam, et al. “The Prevalence of Papillomavirus-16 and -18 Isolated from Women with Cervical Cancer Using Multiplex PCR.” Yafteh, vol. 20, 2019, http://eprints.lums.ac.ir/1557/.
  15. Özdemir, Raziye, et al. “Challenges in Cancer Control Services Provided by Family Physicians in Primary Care: A Qualitative and Quantitative Study From Karabuk Province in Turkey.” Journal of Cancer Prevention, vol. 23, no. 4, Dec. 2018, pp. 176–82, doi:10.15430/JCP.2018.23.4.176.
View all publications
News
References
  1. Bruni L, Barrionuevo-Rosas L, Albero G, Serrano B, Mena M, Gómez D, Muñoz J, Bosch FX, de Sanjosé S. ICO/IARC Information Centre on HPV and Cancer (HPV Information Centre). Statistics. Retrieved December 19, 2018, from http://www.hpvcentre.net/datastatistics.php

  2. Cancer Today. (2018, September). Retrieved October 19, 2018, from https://gco.iarc.fr/.

  3. Cancer Tomorrow. (2018, September). Retrieved October 19, 2018, from https://gco.iarc.fr/.

  4. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. (2018, February 15). Retrieved November 2, 2018, from http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/human-papillomavirus-(hpv)-and-cervical-cance

Disclaimer
Please notify us if you know of other resources, including academic publications, news articles and information that should be added to this page by emailing: hpvmena@gmail.com.